The Good Food Collective

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Summer Share 2013 -- Week Four

We hope all of you enjoyed the holiday week! And before we go any further, we have to thank those of you who were there for the wildest, wackiest GOOD Food Collective distribution EVER. That massive thunderstorm seemed perfectly timed with the Wednesday night distribution where we had many members from various locations joining us all at one time to pick up their 4th of July shares! If you were there, you know that the storm literally flattened the distribution scene. Our mighty distribution team and incredible members kicked into action together to move to safety and minimize damage. Thank you to all of you who made it to distribution and either helped us clean up the carnage of tents and food bins after the event or had to deal with our improvised setup for the remaining of the evening. Some may not have made it, given that the roads all around us were flooded. We are sorry for the challenge last week brought to the experience, but hopeful that you were all safe and sound and made it home with your GOOD FOOD! Speaking of rain storms, we've had a lot more rain than our farmers would like. Some items have been washed out, some are simply slowed and others are hard to get through the mud to harvest. In addition, our farmers have not been able to plant many of the crops that need to be frequently planted. This may result in a lull for a few items in the coming weeks. BUT fret not -- many other crops are doing just fine. The GFC team and our partner farms are being agile and working hard to provide you with a fantastic and abundant share of GOOD FOOD each week! And more good news:  The long-awaited FRUIT SHARE begins this week too and it looks like it will be a fantastic fruit season! Anyone who was in the area last year will remember the sad loss of most peaches and plums due to cold conditions at the wrong time. We have been waiting a very long time in my house to sink our teeth into a perfectly ripened summer local peach!

Kohlrabi!

These little sputnik-shaped vegetables come in green or purple, can be eaten raw or cooked, and taste a lot like broccoli stems. The word kohlrabi is German for cabbage turnip (kohl as in cole-slaw, and rübe for turnip) though kohlrabi is more related to cabbage and cauliflower than to root vegetables. We usually eat them raw, just peeled, sliced and added to a salad, but they are also delicious cooked and are often used in Indian cuisine. We are searching for our recipes it now.